Frugal Breakfasts

One of the easiest ways to save money, live more simply and healthy is to learn how to cook from scratch. That means no boxed, pre-packaged, pre-made food that you find at the grocery store. Not only will you save money, you’ll be healthier too!

So, to help you get started, I’m gathering some recipes I have found on websites, on email groups, from friends and family to help get you started. If you have a recipe to share, email it to me and I’ll add it to the list!

Complete Buckwheat Pancake Mix

  • 4 cups whole wheat flour
  • 1 cup buckwheat flour
  • 1/3 cup soy flour
  • 3/4 cup dry buttermilk powder, OR 1 cup of instant nonfat dry milk powder
  • 1 tablespoon salt
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons baking powder
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 3/4 cup solid vegetable shortening

You need a large bowl or dish pan to mix this in. Measure the whole wheat flour, buckwheat flour, soy flour, dry buttermilk, salt, baking powder and sugar into the large bowl. Using a whisk or your hands, combine everything so it’s evenly distributed. Measure in the shortening. Use your hands to mash it into the dry ingredients, until the mixture is the same consistency as coarse cornmeal. Transfer the mixture to a resealable container. Store on the pantry shelf for about a month, or in the refrigerator or freezer for 6 months. Makes about 7-1/2 cups.

To Prepare:

  • 1 cup Complete Buckwheat Pancake Mix
  • 1/2 cup water

Stir the water and mix together in a small bowl. If the batter seems too thick for pancakes, then add a bit more water and stir again. Drop by 1/4 cupfuls onto a hot, well oiled skillet or griddle. Fry until the bottom of the pancake is brown and the top is dry and covered with small bubbles. Flip the pancake and brown it on the second side. Serve hot with syrup, or Applesauce. Makes 4 pancakes. This recipe can be doubled or tripled as necessary. Good for camping, and mornings when you are rushed.

The soy flour replaces eggs in this recipe, so don’t omit it or replace it with something else. If you don’t have buttermilk powder, then use a full cup of instant dry milk powder instead. This recipe has a lot of fiber and B vitamins. It is my favorite pancake mix. The buckwheat reminds me of my Granny’s pancakes when I was small, and the wood stove was warm on winter mornings.

From HillbillyHousewife.com

Pancake Syrup

  • 2 cups warm tap water
  • 4 cups sugar
  • 2 tablespoons molasses
  • 1-1/2 teaspoons maple flavoring
  • 1/4 teaspoon butter flavoring (optional) 

In a three-quart saucepan combine the water, sugar and molasses. Put the pan on the stove over medium heat. Stir every now and then until the syrup comes to a rolling boil. Watch the syrup carefully because it has a tendency to foam and will boil over if your pan is too small. If this starts to happen, remove the pan from the heat and turn the heat down. After the syrup boils, cover the pot and simmer it for ten minutes over a low flame. Do not stir it for this ten minutes. Remove the pan from the heat. Take off the lid and let it cool on the counter for about 15 minutes. Stir in the maple flavoring (and butter flavoring if you’re using it). Store the syrup in a clean quart canning jar or a clean ketchup bottle (32 oz). I use a funnel to pour the syrup into the jar because the hot syrup can get a little messy. Be careful not to burn yourself.

This syrup is remarkably similar in flavor and texture to real maple syrup. It is thinner than commercial pancake syrups, but slightly thicker than real maple syrup. The taste is clean, simple and fresh. It does not linger in an envelope in your mouth the way some commercial syrups do.

From HillbillyHousewife.com

Five Grain Hot Cereal

  • 1 cup dry oatmeal
  • 1/2 cup quick barley
  • 1/2 cup dry brown rice
  • 1/2 cup whole wheat flour
  • 1/2 cup cornmeal

You need a blender to make this recipe. Get out your blender. Measure the dry oatmeal into it. Whirl the oatmeal until it is powdery, like flour. Dump the oatmeal into a mixing bowl. Measure the barley into the blender. Process it until powdery. Dump it into the bowl with the oatmeal. Measure the brown rice into the blender. Process it until powdery. The rice will take longer processing than the oatmeal or barley. It will be a tiny bit coarser after blending too, that is alright. When it is as powdery as you can get it, dump it into the bowl with the other grains. Add the whole wheat flour and the cornmeal. Stir the mixture up to combine it thoroughly. Transfer the mixture to a resealable container and label. Store on the pantry shelf. Makes 3 cups

 

To Cook:

  • 1/3 cup 5 Grain Cereal
  • 1 cup cold tap water
  • Dash Salt
  • 2 tablespoons apple juice concentrate or honey

In a small saucepan combine the cereal and cold water. You use cold water because it prevents lumps. Add the salt and juice concentrate. Bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce the heat to medium low and simmer for about 3 to 5 minutes. Serve with milk. Makes 1 serving.

To make 4 servings: use 1 cup of 5 Grain Cereal, 3 cups of cold tap water, 1/4 teaspoon of salt, and 1/3 cup apple juice concentrate.

This is a very healthy and hearty way to start the morning. I like this cereal much better than most other mixed grain cereals I have tried. The rice gives the cooked cereal a nice chewy texture which contrasts nicely with the smoothness of the whole wheat flour and cornmeal. If you don’t have quick barley, you can replace it with more oatmeal, or even wheat germ, or wheat bran. I’ve also thought that Rye Flour &/or Ground Flax Seeds might make nice additions. By adding 1/2-cup of each, you would come up with a 7-Grain Hot Cereal. The measurements of cereal to liquid for cooking would remain the same. This cereal is an excellent source of B vitamins and fiber.

From HillbillyHousewife

Pancakes

  • 1 cup milk
  • 1 medium egg
  • 1 tablespoon oil
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 1/2 cups flour

Get out a medium sized bowl. Measure in the milk, egg, oil and sugar. Beat well with a fork or wire whisk. Add the salt, baking powder and flour. Beat again, mixing until the batter is smooth. Cook on a hot, well oiled griddle or skillet. I use about 1/4 cup of batter per pancake. I heat up my iron skillet over medium-high heat, and melt a spoonful of margarine or bacon grease in it. When the fat is almost smoking, I drop in about 1/4 cup of batter. Sometimes I cook two at a time, in the same pan. The pancake will settle down and cook. As it cooks, little bubbles will form around the edges of the pancake. The top will begin to dry out a little too. When the top is beginning to dry out, and the surface has plenty of bubbles on it, turn the pancake and cook the other side. Brown it well, and lay it in a plate. Repeat until all of the batter is used up. I usually cook double this recipe on Saturday mornings. My crew has a big appetite. The recipe as it is written will serve 4 people with average appetites. Doubled, it will serve 6 starving teenagers. Serve with margarine, Pancake Syrup and fresh or canned fruit and milk. 

From HillbillyHousewife.com

Muffins

  • 1/4 cup oil
  • 1 medium egg
  • 1 cup milk
  • 1/4 to 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder (3 teaspoons)
  • 2 cups flour

In a large bowl combine the oil, egg, milk, sugar and salt. Mix it very well with a fork or wire whisk. Measure in the baking powder and flour. Mix again until all of the dough particles are moistened. Do not over mix. The whole thing should take about 20 to 30 strokes. Spoon the batter into a dozen well oiled muffin cups. Bake at 400° for about 20 minutes. Remove from the oven and cool slightly before removing from the pan.

This is the basic recipe. I used to make it every night when I was young and poor. It is so easy and so cheap and so down right good to eat, that it almost seems a shame to expand on it. Notice I say almost, because one of the glorious things about muffins is that this recipe, is only the starting point. I will list several easy variations now, and you can go from here in any direction you like.

Cereal Muffins: After preparing the above recipe using 1/4-cup of sugar, add 1-cup of cooked cereal. You may add oatmeal, or grits, or rice, or farina, or whatever you have left over. This makes about 18 muffins. Rice is my favorite.

Whole Wheat Muffins: Use half or all whole wheat flour instead of the white flour called for. Use 1/3-cup brown sugar for the sweetener.

Rye Muffins: Replace 1/2-cup of white flour with Rye flour. Add 1-teaspoon caraway seeds to the batter. Use 1/4-cup of brown sugar for the sweetener.

Cornmeal Muffins: Replace 1-cup of white flour with cornmeal. Use 1/3-cup of white sugar for the sweetener.

From HillbillyHousewife.com

 Peanut Butter Granola

  • 2 tablespoons margarine
  • 1/3 cup natural peanut butter
  • 1/3 cup honey
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 3 cups rolled oats
  • 1/2 cup raisins (optional)

Begin by melting the margarine and peanut butter together in a 3-quart saucepan. Add the honey, vanilla and salt. Stir the mixture until it is smooth and hot throughout. It doesn’t need to boil. Add the oats. Stir until the oats are completely coated with the sticky gooey peanut butter mixture. It will be chunky. Turn the mixture into an ungreased cookie sheet, or a large 9 by 13-inch pan. Spread the granola out evenly and bake it at 375° for 10 minutes. It will be brown and crispy. Now remove it from the oven and allow it to cool right there in the pan. Break it up into pieces after it is cooled. Transfer the granola to a clean coffee can or sealed canister. Add the raisins, if you are using them, when the granola is cool.

From HillbillyHousewife.com

Honey Granola

  • 3 cups dry oatmeal
  • 1/2 cup margarine (1 stick)
  • 1/2 cup honey
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 cup each nuts and dried fruit (optional)

First melt the margarine in a 3-quart saucepan over medium heat. Add the honey and salt. Honey is easiest to measure in a well oiled measuring cup. Otherwise, just scoop the last of it out of the cup with a clean finger or spoon. Heat the honey briefly with the margarine and then add the oatmeal. Stir it up nicely. It smells really good. Turn the mixture onto an ungreased cookie sheet, the kind with shallow sides; a large 9 by 13-inch pan works well too. Spread the granola out evenly and bake it at 375° for 10 minutes. It should be a toasty brown. Now remove it from the oven and allow it to cool and crisp up right there in the pan. Store it in a clean coffee can or sealed canister. Add the nuts and dried fruit, if you are using them, when the granola is cool. Serve it with milk like regular cereal, or if you are hankering for a divinely inspired treat, get a big bowl of plain yogurt, and sprinkle a large handful of granola on top of it. Mmmmmmmm, very tasty. Sliced bananas are good with this too.

From HillbillyHousewife.com

Brown Sugar Granola

  • 1/2 cup margarine (1 stick)
  • 1 cup raw brown sugar
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 4 cups rolled oats
  • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/2 cup dried fruit (optional)
  • 1/2 cup nuts or seeds (optional)

In a large 4 quart saucepan melt the margarine, sugar and water together. Stir it well and let it simmer for a few minutes (2 or 3 minutes should be enough). Add the salt, oatmeal and cinnamon to the big pot. Remove the pot from the stove and stir up the granola. You want to coat the oats with the brown sugar and margarine, so keep stirring until everything is moistened. Put the granola onto a cookie sheet, the kind with sides. Bake it at 375° for 10 minutes. It should be a nice golden brown. Remove the pan from the oven and allow the granola to cool right there in the pan. When it is cool, break it up into small pieces and transfer it to clean coffee can, or other type of canister. Add the nuts and/or dried fruit when you put it into the canister. Serve for breakfast in a bowl with milk or yogurt. Very tasty.

From HillbillyHousewife.com

Waffles

  • 1-1/4 cups milk
  • 6 tablespoons melted margarine (3/4 of a stick)
  • 2 medium eggs
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 3 teaspoons baking powder (1 tablespoon)
  • 1-3/4 cup whole wheat flour

Get out a large bowl. Pour the milk, margarine and eggs into the bowl. If you are melting the margarine in the microwave, you can melt it in the bowl first, and then add the milk and eggs. Mix these up really well with a whisk or a fork, or electric beaters. Add the salt, baking powder and flour. Beat the batter with a whisk or electric beaters until it is smooth. Preheat your waffle iron according to the instructions. Oil it with a pastry brush if necessary. Use a measuring cup to measure 1/2-cup of batter into each waffle section. Close the waffle iron and allow the waffles to bake for about 2 minutes, or according to the instructions in the manual. When the waffles are well cooked, they should be pretty easy to loosen up with a fork or a chopstick. Gently lay the waffles on a plate and continue cooking until you use up all of the batter. Be careful not to overfill the waffle iron because the extra batter will just spill off and make a big mess. This recipe makes 6 waffles. Serve them with Pancake Syrup, and fruit.

From HillbillyHousewife.com

Biscuits

  • 6 cups self-rising biscuit flour (OR 6 cups flour, plus 3 tablespoons baking powder & 1 Tablespoon salt)
  • 1 cup shortening
  • 2 cups buttermilk OR sour milk OR yogurt thinned with a little milk or water

This recipe is inspired from a very dear friend named Paula. It involves preparing biscuits from scratch and then freezing the unbaked biscuits. Paula created the idea because her family always wanted her good biscuits for supper, and she needed a way to make them hot, and fresh, even on days when she didn’t feel like baking. The results are divinely inspired.

First get out a large mixing bowl. Measure in the self rising biscuit flour (or flour, baking powder and salt). Add the firmly packed shortening and mash it into the flour with your fingers or a fork. DO Not Overmix. The shortening should be casually combined with the flour, and small chunks the size of dried beans should remain. This is what makes the biscuits flakey. Now stir in the buttermilk or sour milk or thinned out yogurt. Stir it up until you have a nice soft dough. Knead the dough about 10 or 12 times. NO more, No less. This activates the gluten in the flour just enough to make good biscuits. Roll the dough out into a nice thick slab. I use a rolling pin, but any sturdy jar or glass will do. Cut the dough into biscuit shapes. Use a clean can or glass rim, if you don’t have a biscuit cutter. Tuna cans are just the right size for big breakfast biscuits. Continue rolling and cutting until all the dough is used up.

Lay waxed paper on a plate or large pan. Arrange the shaped biscuit dough on the waxed paper. Freeze overnight. The next morning the biscuits can be gathered up and stashed in plastic freezer bag.

When you want to cook them, just take out the specific number you want and place them on a lightly oiled cookie sheet or pizza pan. Bake in a preheated 425 to 450° oven for about 10 minutes. The biscuits will rise up beautifully and will be a nice golden brown when done.

These biscuits are better tasting, and much cheaper than canned whack-’em-on-the-counter-biscuits. The whole recipe makes between 30 and 35 medium sized biscuits, or about 20 big breakfast size biscuits (grand-sized).

From HillbillyHousewife.com

Donut Muffins

  • 1/3 cup shortening 
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1 medium egg
  • 1-1/2 cups flour
  • 1-1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon nutmeg 
  • 3/4 cup milk

For The Topping:

  • 1/2 cup powdered sugar
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon      
  • 1/4 cup melted margarine

In a mixing bowl mash together the shortening and sugar. Add the egg and whisk it all up until it is smooth. Make sure you use shortening, Not Margarine. The shortening gives this recipe it’s special texture. Measure the flour, baking powder, salt and nutmeg into the bowl. Pour in the milk. Mix the batter with a whisk until it is smooth. Drop the mixture into 12 oiled muffin cups. Make sure not to over fill the muffin cups, 1/2 to 2/3 full is full enough. Bake the muffins at 350° for 25 minutes, or until the muffins are brown on top. Remove them from the oven and allow them to cool slightly.

Mix the powdered sugar and cinnamon in a small bowl and set aside.

Take the muffins out of the pan. When they are cool enough to handle, dip the tops of the muffins into the melted margarine. Then dip them into the powdered sugar/cinnamon mixture. Arrange the prepared muffins on a large plate and serve while still warm. Makes a dozen. Very good for breakfast and after school or midnight snacks.

This recipe is very very old, at least 80 years old. It was created by a cook with leftover donut batter who didn’t have time to deep fry them. She added a little milk to make the batter thinner, and cooked it in muffin cups instead of deep frying it. The nutmeg is the secret ingredients which gives these muffins their special old fashioned donut flavor. Necessity is the mother of invention, and bless the cook who invented these. My family is grateful.

From HillbillyHousewife.com


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